November 9, 2012

Visualizations of Oklahoma’s Hispanic Population

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Map showing county level hispanic population data contrasted by population density.

Darren Jaworski/Oklahoma Watch

Map showing county level hispanic population data contrasted by population density.

Oklahoma Watch has compiled and presented census data for the Oklahoma hispanic population corresponding to decades worth of demographic change. In order to augment previous stories published on Oklahoma Watch, the following maps give a visual representation of the data collected and the impact on the state.

The controls on the left side of the maps enable zooming and panning. Clicking on the map itself will bring up info boxes for further information.

The first map displays county wide data from the 2000 and 2010 censuses. A blue gradient shows hispanic populations from 2010 concentrated in major population centers, the panhandle, and the southwest and southeast corners of the state.

Hispanic populations by county in a choropleth map showing areas of higher hispanic population percentages as darker blue, and areas of lower hispanic population percentages as lighter blue. Click on individual counties for more statistics.

Below is a city level map highlighting 2010 census figures of the number of hispanic persons of origin dispalying the major hispanic population centers distributed across the state.

Hispanic populations of 2010 by city with two markers. Blue dots indicate hispanic populations of less than or equal to 2,500 persons. Blue markers indicate hispanic populations of greater than 2,500 persons of hispanic origin. Click on individual cities for more statistics.

Hispanic populations of 2000 by city with the same visual reference shows a significant growth in the hispanic population across the state. Compared to the 2010 census figures, growth has occurred in nearly every city, with at least 400 Oklahoma towns and cities experiencing at least a 10% increase in hispanic population over the 10 year period.

2000 Hispanic populations by city with two markers. Blue dots indicate hispanic populations of less than or equal to 2,500 persons. Blue markers indicate hispanic populations of greater than 2,500 persons of hispanic origin. Those with not enough data appear as red dots. Click on individual cities for more statistics.

The impact of the hispanic population on the 2012 presidential election cannot be discerned from Tuesday’s results. Every Oklahoma county was won by Republican Mitt Romney.

2012 Presidential election results by county in a choropleth map showing counties with the highest percentage voting for Romney as a darker red than those with a lower percentage voting for Romney.

Katherine Borgerding and Juan Sanchez researched, compiled, and analyzed the data. Visualizations by Darren Jaworski.